Why publication guidelines were made

Sugar versus butter

Ah, times have changed. An article in JAMA Internal Medicine reveals the practices that led to the 1967 publication of a 2-part literature review on “Dietary Fats, Carbohydrates and Atherosclerotic Disease.”

In short, the review articles were written with heavy involvement from the Sugar Research Foundation, which has since become the Sugar Association with a mission to “promote the consumption of sugar through sound scientific principles while maintaining an understanding of the benefits that sugar contributes to the quality of wholesome foods and beverages.”

From a the perspective of a medical writer acquainted with publication guidelines, the current article lays out a troubling path to publication for the 2-part review. Continue reading Why publication guidelines were made

“Publish that Paper” just released: Free e-course to improve your scientific publication record

Researcher performing work at a laptop computer.

Are you having a difficult time writing a scientific paper? Do you want to publish your manuscripts in more prestigious journals? You are not alone.

It is becoming harder to receive recognition for your manuscript (in the form of citations) when competing against the approximate 1.8 million articles published each year and growing at 3% per year. At some established journals, rejection rates are on the rise because of an increased number of submissions.

I’ve just released a free e-course, “Publish that Paper,” to help you polish your scientific manuscripts and boost your publication record.  You’ll learn tips and techniques that will help your papers get accepted quickly.  Editors will appreciate the improved results and colleagues will praise your clear data.

To become a world-class scientist today one must…be able to navigate the publishing process with skill and speed, as well as write with clarity, accuracy, and grace. Monica Bradford, Executive Editor, Science

Cartoon depicting peer review as a series of physical beatings.
Cartoon by Nick D Kim, scienceandink.com. Used by permission.

The content in these lessons is meant to be general enough to apply to manuscripts across all STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics, medicine) fields.

Publish that Paper” is a 14-part e-course that I developed to help scientists clearly communicate their research. At the end of the lessons, you will have amassed a list of resources and guidelines that you can refer back to as often as needed.

Tell me what you need to learn about scientific publication. What is the biggest thing you’re struggling with today? I’d love to hear from you.

Do you have questions about the e-course? Please email me and I will be happy to help out.